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Roger Bresnahan

 

Roger Bresnahan. I'm fairly easy on Hall of Famers, but this one is a head scratcher. For his MLB career, Bresnahan had a .279 batting average with only six seasons of 100 hits or more (142 is his season high). To his credit, he had a .386 lifetime OBP.

BTW, as a manager he had a 328–432 win-loss record, so he's not in the HoF for that.

It appears Bresnahan is best known for popularizing the use of protective equipment in baseball by introducing shin guards and developing the first batting helmet. There is certainly value for that.

He passed away on Dec. 4, 1944, and was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1945.

These are the cards I have of HoFer Roger Bresnahan.

2003 National Baseball Hall of Fame Postcard.

1982 Dover Reprint of 1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border.

Monarch Corona Reprint of 1911 Turkey Red Cabinets T3, Card #4.

1977 Dover Reprint of 1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border.

1916 Sporting News (M101-5) Reprint.

1961 Fleer Baseball Greats, Card #10.

1977-84 Galasso Glossy Greats, Card # 179.

1980-87 SSPC HOF, Card #29.

1992 Conlon Collection TSN, Card # 459.

My favorite card from this post: 1961 Fleer - but, if I had an original of ANY of the mini reprints, I would go with that.

What's your favorite?

Thanks for visiting!
CinciCuse Bill 


Comments

  1. I like the Sporting News card. Didn't realize his stats were so lacking.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Well, Bresnahan was one of the best catchers of the early years of baseball--in 1929 Miller Huggins named him to his all-time all-star team. https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=A2IbAAAAIBAJ&pg=3786,1968004&dq=miller-huggins&hl=en By JAWS he's still in the top 20 catchers of all time, so he's not that bad a choice, really.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That was a cool article - thanks for passing that on!

      Delete
  3. Never heard of Bresnahan... but I'm always happy to learn about another hall of famer. Favorite card? I'd say the Galasso Glossy Greats.

    ReplyDelete
  4. His name was new to me, hopefully I'll be able to remember it :)

    ReplyDelete
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